How To Watch NASA Crash A Spacecraft Into An Asteroid On Monday

Image Credits: Google

NASA's Double Asteroid Redirect Test (DART) is on its way to the surface of an asteroid dubbed Dimorphos, where it will collide at speeds of nearly 14,000 miles per hour.

Image Credits: Google

Researchers hope that the collision will alter the asteroid's orbit, causing it to accelerate slightly.

Image Credits: Google

Neither Dimorphos nor its larger companion, Didymos, pose any threat to Earth, but the experiment is aimed to explore if a similar collision may make a difference

Image Credits: Google

During its final approach, DART will be on its own. The spacecraft is equipped with an autonomous guidance system.

Image Credits: Google

The autonomous guiding system will direct DART to Dimorphos, which is only 163 metres (530 feet) wide.

Image Credits: Google

On a human scale, 163 metres is big, but astronomically, it is so little and far away that experts still don't know what it looks like.

Image Credits: Google

People will be able to watch along with the action in a somewhat delayed real-time thanks to DART's camera.

Image Credits: Google

"What you see on the ground is 45 seconds late, but that's still fantastic because an image arrives every second." DART's Elena Adams stated.

Image Credits: Google

The DART impact is scheduled for 7:14 p.m. ET, but NASA will begin covering it at 6 p.m. ET on Monday, September 26th.

Image Credits: Google

You can watch the collision live on NASA's website or YouTube channel, or follow along on the agency's Facebook and Twitter feeds.

Image Credits: Google